George Harrison - The Last Performance

Jas H Duke (1939-1992) : An Anarchist Poet

From the Australian poetry zine ‘Going Down Swinging’, No.13, March 1993.

Track 4: Interview with Bill Marshall for 3PBS-FM radio (197?). Answering the Telephone. The Morning of a Bullshit Artist. Shit Poem (all from 3PBS-FM recording 197?). Bruno’s Injury. My Brother at the Dole Office. Noisy Incident. The Future of Richmond (Collective Effort recordings).

Jas died of a heart attack on June 19, 1992.

As he was being wheeled into surgery, Thalia (a Melbourne poet) who went to visit him, told the nurses to take care of him “‘cos he was one of Australia’s greatest poets.” They laughed, and asked him to recite a poem. Though in a lot of pain, he sat up and recited ‘Solidarity Explained’:

When the axe first came into the forest
The trees said to each other
The handle is one of us.

SEEING THE ELEPHANT Trailer

A multi-plot, multi-lingual drama, produced by Billy Marshall Stoneking & Amin Palangi. Written by Billy Marshall Stoneking

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The writer is a character, the audience is a character, the tribe or tribes from whence the story and the writer has sprung are characters, the characters are characters… so who’s writing it? It’s characters all the way down.
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The writer is a character, the audience is a character, the tribe or tribes from whence the story and the writer has sprung are characters, the characters are characters… so who’s writing it? It’s characters all the way down.

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I write scripts to serve as skeletons awaiting the flesh and sinew of images.
— Ingmar Bergman
Science-fiction, as a genre, is the projection into the future of a narrative that occurring right now, but which we are - mostly - unable to see or recognise owing to the way in which it is disguised or portrayed. By setting a contemporary narrative in the future we ask the audience to imagine what the world will be like then, when in fact what is happening is that we are showing what the world is already like, and inviting the audience to recognise the similarities. The future is HERE, only without the trappings that usually accompany the science-fiction genre. On this same subject, Ray Bradbury once observed, “People ask me to predict the future, when all I want to do is prevent it.”

Stoneking

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Some writers might tell you that writing is like a piece of magic - a process of creating something out of nothing, and I guess I used to think about it that way too a long long time ago. But as I’ve lived my life and loved and lost friends and family, and seen dreams smashed and resurrected, and marveled at the pettiness, drear ambition and ignorance of the herd of which I am a part, I can no longer say that a poem or a story or a script comes from nothing. If it’s any good, if it has any power, any potent emotional body, then it’s something that a writer has paid for, not only in time, but in all the anxiety that accompanies living and those small fret-filled acts of becoming present that make it possible for us to see beyond our little patch of immediacy. It’s not just a reaching out, but a reaching in, into the depths of our being from whence we’ve sprung.

Stoneking

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The most challenging part about the very difficult art of reading a script is being able to see and hear what is not being shown or said. The most hardest thing about writing a script is writing what is not seen or heard.

Billy Marshall Stoneking

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True story. Occurred in 1981 during a protracted visit to Papunya Aboriginal Settlement in the Northern Territory by poets Gary Snyder and Nanao Sakaki.  READ MORE ABOUT THE VISIT

True story. Occurred in 1981 during a protracted visit to Papunya Aboriginal Settlement in the Northern Territory by poets Gary Snyder and Nanao Sakaki.  READ MORE ABOUT THE VISIT