Don’t follow the crowd - follow STONEKING - enter the DRAMA at this most extraordinary Facebook site

Don’t follow the crowd - follow STONEKING - enter the DRAMA at this most extraordinary Facebook site

If you find yourself writing a screenplay you’re not sure anyone needs, it’s important to understand who - other than yourself - you’re writing it for, and in what ways you want it to change them.

Billy Marshall Stoneking

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Moving about has always been good for writing dialogue and images - those crucial lines of dialogue you haven’t been able to find may well be riding the light rail out of Glebe this afternoon, and what about those two lovers - not just any lovers - laughing on the grass a few kilometres from where you got off the ferry?

Billy Marshall Stoneking

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9 IRRATIONAL NOTIONS/PREJUDICES OF DRAMATIC CHARACTERS & THEIR WRITERS


Drama is conducted by the logic of cause and effect, but it is invariably grounded in any number of irrational assumptions held by the characters (including the writer) - irrationalities that approximate those embraced by an interested audience. In working with story, characters (including the writer) continuously ‘bump’ up against these irrationalities, which they employ and exploit for dramatic effect by their actions and which the writer cultivates in the conception and creation of the dramatic story.

Here are 9 examples of the largely unchallenged notions from which all dramatic story-action springs. Can you think of others?


9 IRRATIONAL NOTIONS/PREJUDICES OF DRAMATIC CHARACTERS & THEIR WRITERS

1. The notion that being loved by a significant other is a necessity to a character’s well-being, and indeed their life.

2. The notion that the acts of others (other characters) are more offensive or more wicked or somehow more destructive than those enacted by the protagonist, and that, as such, these others must be punished or held accountable for their wickedness.

3. The notion that life is unnaturally cruel whenever things don’t go the way the protagonist (or the writer) would want them to go.

4. The notion that human misery is created and forced upon the protagonist by the actions of others.

5. The notion that it is right or irrelevant to be terribly upset when confronted by something dangerous or fearsome, and that it is okay to obsess about it.

6. The notion that it is easier and somehow more likely to produce a desired result if the character and/or writer avoids or ignores the problems and difficulties that confront him/her. (‘the passive character’).

7. The notion that a character cannot act unless they are possessed of something more powerful than their own inner resources (e.g.: a weapon).

8. The notion that every protagonist - in order to be effective - must be thoroughly competent.

9. The notion that because something once strongly affected a character’s life, it should always affect it and always in the same way.


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WIND - This disturbing and legendary Hungarian film, demonstrates in one, slow pan the fundamental dramatic grammar of the successful short.

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